MonkeySelfie

Monkey Copyrights Revisited

by AEON Law on February 8, 2016

 

MONKEY COPYRIGHT?

NOT IN MY COURT, SAYS ORRICK

PETA MAY APPEAL

 

As we previously reported, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) filed a lawsuit in federal court arguing that a monkey can own a copyright in its own work.

monkeyUS District Court Judge William Orrick declined to grant the monkey a copyright. In fact, he declined to even consider whether the monkey should get a copyright.

David Slater, a nature photographer, visited the Indonesian island of Sulawesi in 2011. A macaque tripped the shutter of Slater’s camera resulting in an image famously known as the “Monkey Selfie.”

Several outlets, including Wikipedia, claim that since a monkey snapped the photo, no one owns the copyright. Slater claims he has a British copyright, and that copyright should be honored around the world. PETA claims the plaintiff monkey, which they’ve given the name “Naruto,” owns the copyright.

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No Copyrights For Monkeys

by AEON Law on December 11, 2015

 

PETA ASKS THE JUDGE

NOT TO TOSS MONKEY SELFIE

COPYRIGHT LAWSUIT

 

People for thmonkey selfiee Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), an animal-rights organization, has asked a California federal judge not to throw out a copyright case it brought on behalf of a monkey.

According to the complaint,

Naruto is a free, autonomous six-year-old male member of the Macaca nigra species, also known as a crested macaque, residing in the Tangkoko Reserve on the island of Sulawesi, Indonesia. In or around 2011 Naruto took a number of photographs of himself, including one image – the internationally famous photograph known as the “Monkey Selfie.”

Naruto used the unattended camera of nature photographer David Slater. Slater self-published a book based on the image; the cover is shown above.

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